May 9, 2021

LIVE RESULTS: Trump secured tight victories in four needed battleground states, but the presidential race is far from over

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~3/oMPNtquMAfM/2020-election-results
  • There’s no clear leader yet in the presidential race between Donald Trump and Joe Biden as results continue to come in. 
  • Trump picked up four major wins in the key battleground states of Florida, Iowa, Ohio, and Texas, Insider and Decision Desk HQ project. 
  • There’s still a substantial amount of the vote left to be counted and reported in a number of key swing states, including Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.  
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Update: President Trump racks up key victories in Florida, Ohio, and Texas, but there’s no clear leader yet 

Live Updates

Automatically updates every minute

President Donald Trump is projected to pick up Florida’s 29 electoral college votes, Ohio’s 18 electoral college votes, and Texas’ 38 electoral college votes, Decision Desk HQ projects. 

Polls have now closed or are closing in all US states. It’s still too early to call winners in the key battleground states of Arizona, Georgia, North Carolina, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. 

More votes are still outstanding in many of those states, and will be counted and reported from those states in the coming hours into Wednesday morning and afternoon. 

The race for the presidency between Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden is zeroing in on a number of battleground states key in each candidate’s quests to win. They’ll be battling for the popular vote, but the real election decider is the Electoral College.

In the electoral system, states are allocated a number of electors equal to how many representatives they have in Congress. Presidential candidates must earn 270 Electoral College votes or more to win the election. All states except for Maine and Nebraska use a winner-take-all system, in which the candidate who wins the most votes earns all the state’s Electoral College votes.

In addition to the presidential race, hundreds of critical US Senate and House races on the ballot this fall will determine the balance of power in Washington, DC, for years to come.

Election Day is Tuesday, November 3, 2020, but more than 100 million Americans had already cast their vote prior to Election Day, according to the US Elections Project.

Election results are never truly finalized on election night, but, in most past years, enough of the results have come in on election night for big news networks and outlets to call the winner of the race.

But because of the increase in Americans casting mail ballots, which take longer to process and count than in-person votes, and can arrive after Election Day in many states, the outcome of the presidential race and other key down-ballot races might not be called on election night.

A candidate is marked as leading in a given race when they are ahead in the vote count, and Decision Desk HQ projects winners based on factors including the vote totals reported so far and exit polling. 

Arizona, Florida, Ohio, Iowa, and North Carolina — which allow a substantial amount of preprocessing and counting of mail ballots before Election Day — are expected to report a substantial number of their results on election night.

But many counties in the key swing states of Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, which do not allow for as much preprocessing of ballots before the polls open, will count the bulk of their mail-in ballots on or after Election Day.

Officials are set to process ballots accurately and efficiently, but races in those states might take longer to call. 

Here’s what you need to know about the top 10 swing states most likely to decide the election, including what the polls say and how the top election experts and handicappers at the Cook Political Report, Sabato’s Crystal Ball at the University, and Inside Elections rate Trump’s and Biden’s chances of winning each state.

There are six states on the map — Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin — that flipped from voting for President Barack Obama in 2012 to vote for Trump in 2016.

Nebraska’s and Maine’s 2nd Congressional Districts also account for one Electoral College vote each. 

Nebraska’s 2nd Congressional District is rated as “leans Democratic” in the Electoral College by Inside Elections, the Cook Political Report, and Sabato’s Crystal Ball. Trump carried the 2nd District by a margin of 2.2 percentage points in the 2016 election, according to the Daily Kos.

Maine’s 2nd Congressional District is rated as a “tossup” in the Electoral College by Inside Elections and the Cook Political Report and “leans Republican” by Sabato’s Crystal Ball. Trump carried Maine’s 2nd District by a margin of 10 percentage points in the 2016 election, according to the Daily Kos.

See Insider’s full coverage of the race for the US Senate, the US House, 2020’s gubernatorial elections, and some of the most critical ballot initiatives around the country. 

Senate:

House:

House:

Senate:

House:

Senate:

House:

Maine

Senate:

House:

Senate:

House:

House:

Senate:

House:

House:

House:

Senate:

House:

House: